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Its a load of crock! I'm with Stelly; I work with a few good Ozzies, worth their weight in gold and no one complains when we work elsewhere. Why not down there?
The union are just a bunch of gansters and their devoted lazy control-van lawyer members. We were there legally and were still kicked out. It was obvious that Australia is run by a bunch of blokes wanting a lot for nothing, using any means available to keep it that way. No-one has the balls to tell them either.



I've wiped the dust off my boots and moved on. The hell with them.

Adios
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Stelly,

Whether satisfying ‘MUA quotas’ or not, please have a read of http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/faq2-subclass-457.htm

Australia's temporary skilled migration program aims to fill skill shortages within the Australian economy that cannot be filled from the local labour market. The recent economic downturn resulted in a decrease to the number of skilled positions within the Australian labour market.

Employers wishing to sponsor overseas workers to fill skilled positions are required to attest to having a strong record of, or demonstrated commitment to, employing local labour and non-discriminatory employment practices
.”

My personal views:

From the above, it doesn’t seem fair to you, but seems fair to Australian citizens and PR’s, that is if you were replaced by a ‘local’ that is / was competent to fill your position.

Indeed I am not a member of any Union or currently working in Oz, but feel happier knowing that at least some employers abide by the spirit and or letter of which the law is intended (Sorry if it’s at your own personal expense), rather than finding perceived “loop-holes” to undercut the local labour market.

If I have to jump through hoops to obtain relevant visas to work in a global market, so be it.

If a suitably ‘qualified & experienced’ national replaced me and paid at the going market rate, that’s the way it is and should be.

If you have a problem with the spirit / letter of the laws pertaining to foreign workers (particularly labour paid under market rate) in the North Sea, UK, EU etc, I suggest you join and lobby your local Union, Member for Parliament, press etc. What is their response?
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Stelly and R2D2, aren't you agency contractors and weren't some of the replacements for you and all the agency people forced off the job other foreign nationals who were on salary with the ROV operator and paid less than you?

This is a thread about the ways companies will try to get out of paying going rates, it has an Australian bias but this isn't happening just in Australia. In your case it appears that you were foreign nationals being paid the going rate and were replaced with other foreign nationals being paid less. Exactly the situation we should be fighting against. Maybe you should also be placing some blame your lesser paid salaried colleagues for forcing you out of your well earned comfort zone.
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Just to muddy the waters further I was just visa'd up for Australia, 1yr multi entry business plus full Australian Tax liability for all monies earned while working there, (offshore) javascript:emoticon('Crying or Very sad')and this was by everyones least favorite company javascript:emoticon('Shocked') So claims of visa loop-hole are ringing a little hollow, I will not say it does not happen and probably will continue to happen. But in my case my visa is legit all the way.
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"Just to muddy the waters further I was just visa'd up for Australia, 1yr multi entry business plus full Australian Tax liability for all monies earned while working there, (offshore) javascript:emoticon('Crying or Very sad')and this was by everyones least favorite company javascript:emoticon('Shocked') So claims of visa loop-hole are ringing a little hollow, I will not say it does not happen and probably will continue to happen. But in my case my visa is legit all the way."


A little disappointed to hear that but happy to see that you're paying tax in my homeland.

BTW "everyone's least favourite company" should not be judged by North Sea standards in this neck of the woods, here in Oz their workers were amongst the first to sign up to a union-backed pay agreement, this has left the workers slightly dis-advantaged (in comparison with some other companies later agreements which capitalised on the precedent set).

However I'm sure you'll agree that working for a genuine Aussie rate will sh*t all over anywhere else and you don't need a flak jacket! Mad Wink
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I don't know mate, maybe not a flak jacket, but id still try and find a hard-back book to shove down the back of your shorts when dealing with the aussi tax departments !! Laughing
Talk in anger and you'll make the best speech you'll ever regret.

www.savante.co.uk
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I don't know mate, maybe not a flak jacket, but id still try and find a hard-back book to shove down the back of your shorts when dealing with the aussi tax departments !! Laughing


If you are taxed as a resident:

2009-2010 tax rates for AUD$80,000 to $180,000 (STG44,600 to 100,500) are AUD$17, 850 (STG9,950) plus 38c in the dollar over $80,000. So the tax on $180,000 is $55,850 (STG31,200)

45% for earnings over $180,000.

And no National Insurance to pay. Compares favourably to most places I would say.

But if you are taxed as a non resident what savante says is true, 29% from dollar 1 up to $35,000, then follow the resident's rates on the way up.
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I thought if you were a non resident you got your first fifteen days free each time you work in Austrailia. Is this the case or another tax lie I heard offshore.

How does it work if you are working as a Ltd company?
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if anyone subscribes to this site, this article is of interest. post it if you can.

http://petroleumnews.net/

Tax change brings overseas workers back home
(Thursday, 28 January 2010)


OPTIONS for employing skilled staff are becoming limited as the big projects snap up available workers, but changes to Australian tax laws for offshore workers could see some Australian talent return home.
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I didn't think there was any Australian talent Shocked
Well ............apart from Dame Edna and Rolf Harris Laughing
Put ya brain in gear before ye open thy gob !
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http://petroleumnews.net/

INDUSTRY groups have welcomed the Australian government’s permanent skilled migration reforms which will focus on attracting more highly skilled workers into Australia.

again if anyone subscribes to this site, care to share this article ?

notice it says permanent.
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This is off the website: Minister for Immigration and Citizenship
If you care to read through it, it implies that Oz states will have more of a say in the type of skilled people they need to fulfil their own local requirements.

Migration reforms to deliver Australia's skills needs

Monday, 8 February 2010

The Rudd Government is reforming the permanent skilled migration program to ensure it is more responsive to the needs of industry and employers and better addresses the nation’s future skill needs.

The reforms will deliver a demand rather than a supply driven skilled migration program that meets the needs of the economy in sectors and regions where there are shortages of highly skilled workers, such as healthcare, engineering and mining. The major reforms to the skilled migration program are:
20 000 would-be migrants will have their applications cancelled and receive a refund.

All offshore General Skilled Migration applications lodged before 1 September 2007 will have their applications withdrawn. These are people who applied overseas under easier standards, including lower English language skills and a less rigorous work experience requirement. It is expected about 20 000 people fall into this category. The department will refund their visa application charge at an estimated cost of $14 million. Average applications cost between $1500 and $2000 and most contain more than one person.

The list of occupations in demand will be tightened so only highly skilled migrants will be eligible to apply for independent skilled migration visas.

The wide-ranging Migration Occupations in Demand List (MODL) will be revoked immediately. The list is outdated and contains 106 occupations, many of which are less-skilled and no longer in demand. A new and more targeted Skilled Occupations List (SOL) will be developed by the independent body, Skills Australia, and reviewed annually. It will be introduced mid-year and focus on high value professions and trades. The Critical Skills List introduced at the beginning of 2009 which identified occupations in critical demand at the height of the global financial crisis will also be phased out.

The points test used to assess migrants will be reviewed to ensure it selects the best and brightest.

Potential migrants gain points based on their qualifications, skills and experience, and proficiency in English. The current points test puts an overseas student with a short-term vocational qualification gained in Australia ahead of a Harvard-educated environmental scientist. A review of the points test used to assess General Skilled Migration applicants will consider issues including whether some occupations should warrant more points than others, whether sufficient points are awarded for work experience and excellence in English, and whether there should be points for qualifications obtained from overseas universities. The review will report to Government later this year.

Certain occupations may be capped to ensure skill needs are met across the board.

Amendments to the Migration Act will be introduced this year to give the Minister the power to set the maximum number of visas that may be granted to applicants in any one occupation if need be. This will ensure that the Skilled Migration Program is not dominated by a handful of occupations.

Development of state and territory-specific migration plans.

Individual state and territory migration plans will be developed so they can prioritise skilled migrants of their own choosing. This recognises that each state and territory has different skills requirements. For example, Western Australia may have a shortage of mining engineers while Victoria may have a requirement for more architects. Under the new priority processing arrangements, migrants nominated by a state and territory government under their State Migration Plan will be processed ahead of applications for independent skilled migration.

The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Senator Chris Evans, said the new arrangements will give first priority to skilled migrants who have a job to go to with an Australian employer. For those who don’t have an Australian employer willing to sponsor them, the bar is being raised.

‘There are plenty of occupations where there is an adequate supply of young Australians coming through our schools, TAFE colleges and universities to take up new job opportunities. They must be given the opportunity to fill these vacancies first,’ Senator Evans said.

‘But there are some occupations where there will be high demand for skills. Hospitals can’t go without nurses, country towns can’t do without a local GP and the resources sector increasingly needs skills.

‘These latest changes will continue reforms already implemented by the government and result in a more demand-driven skilled migration program that attracts highly skilled migrants to Australia to work in areas of critical need.’

The government recognises that the changes will affect some overseas students currently in Australia intending to apply for permanent residence.

Those international students who hold a vocational, higher education or postgraduate student visa will still be able to apply for a permanent visa if their occupation is on the new Skilled Occupations List. If their occupation is not on the new SOL, they will have until 31 December 2012 to apply for a temporary skilled graduate visa on completion of their studies which will enable them to spend up to 18 months in Australia to acquire work experience and seek sponsorship from an employer.

The changes will in no way impact on international students coming to Australia to gain a legitimate qualification and then return home.

The speech by Senator Evans explaining the changes to the skilled migration program delivered at the Australian National University.
See: Changes to Australia's skilled migration program
James Mc
Site Admin
www.rovworld.com

Shocked Search First - Ask questions later Thumb Up
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Experienced ROV Shift Supervisor required, to work off the coast of Australia, beginning early December for approx. 1 month duration.

Must hold existing visa, or be able to attain one.


Guys.. My bad... this was my ad, and there was no discrimination of Australian citizens meant, I assumed it'd be taken as given that nationals would be accepted.

I'd never really thought about the old saying; ASSUME = ASS of U & ME, but blimey it seems a bit apt now. Embarassed
Andy Falconer
Oil & Gas and Renewable Energy Consultant
STR Group

afalconer@strgroup.co.uk
0044 2392 322390
www.strgroup.co.uk
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Andy,

It was a "hypothetical" that I applied to your post. I also PM'd you asking for further clarification and got no reply which further added to my speculation. Obviously, due to your late participation in the thread, you were looking for email replies to your post rather than PMs.

I didn't mean to imply that you or your company were trying to circumvent agreed wage agreements, but your post made me think about ways unscrupulous companies may go about doing this. If I have caused any offense please accept my apologies.

As I have recently been offered less than the going trainee's rate (when the pounds are converted to AUD) by a UK agency for a supervisor's position in Australia, this thread for me has moved beyond speculation. Not only was the rate unacceptably low for working in Australia, it is also about £30 lower than the UK based Supervisor rate I was getting 3 years ago.

I leave next week to go on the job, they're about to repossess the Porsche. Laughing Laughing
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Hi Micbeth,

No offense taken or meant, and apologies about the lack of replies, still not on here regular enough!

It's always a bit of a minefield posting work, especially when you don't get as much info as you'd like to!

Here's hoping that things are picking up, especially from a rates perspective, and good luck on the trip, everyone's got to have at least one plaything!!
Andy Falconer
Oil & Gas and Renewable Energy Consultant
STR Group

afalconer@strgroup.co.uk
0044 2392 322390
www.strgroup.co.uk

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