ROVworld Subsea Information

VideoRay ROV sends back spectacular images of bizarre undersea life near South P
Date: Wednesday, October 24, 2007 @ 11:00:00 EDT
Topic: ROV NEWS


VideoRay ROV sends back spectacular images of bizarre undersea life near South Pole On October 17th, the VideoRay microROV made its first dive under the ice near McMurdo Station, Antarctica, sending images of undersea life few would expect in this extremely cold and seemingly desolate continent. See the Project S.C.I.N.I. blog and the PolarTREC expedition blog for an account of the dive, and pictures both above and below the ice.

VideoRay has played a major role in the S.C.I.N.I. project (Submersible Capable of under Ice Navigation and Imaging) for the last few years. Led by Stacy Kim of Moss Landing Marine Laboratory and Bob Zook, "Chief Gizmologist" on the S.C.I.N.I. Project, and funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, the project has involved the development of a special ROV to penetrate thick ice through small holes. Marcus Kolb, VideoRay's Director of Research and Development, serving on the design and implementation team brought a standard VideoRay along to act as a backup and "dive buddy". Though it cannot pass through the tiny (around 15cm / 6 inch) holes that the S.C.I.N.I. ROV was developed to explore, the VideoRay was successfully deployed through the dive hut hole in a test of the project's navigation system, bringing back startling photos from this extreme environment.

Further developments can be followed in the coming weeks on the blogs. Other underwater polar projects are in process - see http://www.polartrec.com - but none are currently equipped with functioning ROVs.

VideoRay ROV captures images of bizarre aquatic life in frigid waters below Antarctica.
VideoRay ROV captures images of bizarre aquatic life in frigid waters below Antarctica.
  Polychaete (bristle worm) is called Flabelligera.
Polychaete (bristle worm) is called Flabelligera.
  View from the submerged VideoRay looking up to the surface through nearly 18 feet of ice.
View from the submerged VideoRay looking up to the surface through nearly 18 feet of ice.
 

 








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